Developing A Resume That Leaves Few Questions For Recruiters

A recruiter reviews hundreds of resumes a day. Typically, a recruiter will know whether a person is a possible fit for a role based on their current and previous jobs. Unfortunately, there are times when a recruiter passes on a potential candidate not because they are not qualified, but because their resume doesn’t show that they have worked in the field or industry that is needed for the opportunity.

Example

Hiring: Sales Professional with telecommunications experience required.

Resume: Provides company name, date of employment, responsibilities and all their awards and achievements, but no direct mention of what the company’s experience in the telecommunication field.

Recruiter thoughts: Pass! The candidate can probably sell, but never sold in the required industry.

Candidate after receiving rejection letter: What??? I can do the job in my sleep.

Job Search Tip!

When developing your resume include a brief description of the company or industry your current and previous roles were in. Well-known and branded companies are easily identified and will give a highlight to the industry or type of company, but not so known companies or start-ups may have a great company name, but not indicate the space the organization services. Include a brief introduction or reference to the type company in the summary of your responsibilities.

 

 

Closing A Candidate On A Job Offer

You get great news; your candidate is being offered the job! Hooray! Until you speak with the candidate and they are not sure they want to accept the job offer. You wonder how is this possible. They were engaged during the interview process. What went wrong? Many times the reasons why a candidate decides not to accept an offer has little to do with you as a recruiter. What you can learn from this experience is how to build a better relationship with your candidates and minimize last minute surprises.

I once persuaded my 15-year-old daughter to participate in a week-long internship with McKesson during the summer. She has always had an interest in science and as a part of the Women in Technology (WIT) program she would be able to attend an internship and learn about the many facets of the company. What I saw as a great learning opportunity and extra-curricular activity, she saw as giving up of week of swimming, volleyball and excessive TV watching. She had previously participated in similar programs and questioned the benefit. I liked that she did not just accept me signing her up for a program and wanted to know more about it, but I am the parent- so Go! We talked about the pros and cons. We looked at other programs that she could attend. By the end of our discussion she was excited to be participate in the internship.

When we are working with a candidate, just like with my daughter, we must keep in mind that they are human. That is what this is all about- human capital. Recruiters must build and manage relationships, minimize conflict and be flexible.  The goal is to connect talent with potential employers. As the recruiter you may see this as a great opportunity, but the candidate may see it as a risk. So how do you close the deal when a candidate is reluctant?

Empathy: I remember being 15 years old and on summer break. The last thing you want to do is anything school related. Just as I had to share with my daughter that I understood it was her summer break; I also reminded her that one-week out of 12 would not take all her summer fun away.  We also discussed the benefits of networking and learning about career options.

Recruiters must remember that leaving your current job and starting another can be exciting or scary. Depending on the reason for the change can have a definite impact on your decision. Always share with a candidate that you understand their apprehension. Respond genuinely by sharing all the benefits of the opportunity, but respect their ultimate decision.  You may not have the opportunity to place the candidate in the current opportunity, but that does not mean they may not be a better opportunity for them in the future.

Partnering: As a parent we must manage our children’s schedules, friendships and guide them toward the future. It’s not always easy, but it can be a learning experience that you and your child have together. It helps you as a parent and models for your child how to build and maintain relationships.

Once you and a candidate begin to work together it is your responsibility as a talent broker to develop a rapport with the candidate. Although it is a professional relationship, very different than the one with your child, there are still traits that are very similar to your personal relationships. You must develop trust between you and the candidate. With trust comes respect. The candidate and recruiter must respect each other’s time and decisions. Staying in communication and talking through the process will minimize any surprises or misconceptions. A part of the communication process is asking relevant questions. Ask candidates if they are working with other recruiters? Have they gone on other job interviews? Are they in a “curious about the job market” stage or actively pursuing or willing to consider a new opportunity? These questions will help you as you continue to work with the candidate.

Flexibility: I gave my daughter options if she did not choose to attend the week internship. The options were still chosen by me and I led most of the discussion, but I showed her that compromise can be considered and that can lead to consensus.

When working with candidates, being flexible in your schedule and time is important. Most candidates will appreciate you taking a call in the evening and answering their questions, but they will really appreciate when you can openly and honestly discuss their options. Flexibility goes beyond making yourself availability, it encompasses the ability to be adaptive to the situation. If your candidate is struggling with making a decision provide additional resources or options for them to consider. There may reasons you are not aware of why the candidate may be reluctant to take the job. These reasons can include: gender, location, tenure, salary and other factors that a candidate may contemplate, but most importantly as a recruiter you must be consider and address.

As a recruiter it is your priority to keep a candidate-focused approach while working with the candidate through the hiring process. A general interest in candidates can go a long way and prepare you for the possibility that they may not take the job. Making the experience as seamless as possible can benefit both you and the candidate.

I Became a Better Recruiter by Running with my Husband.

My husband and business partner has been in the staffing and recruiting industry for over 20 years. He’s worked in corporate recruitment and at agencies, he’s been a contract recruiter and now owns his own executive search firm. I was an educator. I taught from first grade up to college until I decided to make a change and come to work for our company full-time as a recruiter. I remember how I would listen to Kendall’s phone screens when he worked from home which helped a lot. I felt comfortable to begin my new career, but understood that there would be a learning curve.

After a few years of recruiting and taking on other responsibilities in the firm, I strengthened my skills and was becoming a successful recruiter. I enjoy continuous learning, so I attend workshops, webinars and networking events to help me keep abreast of the best practices and strategies in recruiting. My most effective learning experience was when I began running with my husband.

He and I will sometimes run in our neighbor or at the high school track. We do sprints, jogs and even run the stadium stairs. One day while running in our neighbor we approached a hill that has quite a steep incline. We had already run about two miles and I was not ready to take the hill. I was tired. He shared that we should run it with everything we had so to not prolong getting up it and it would bring us closer to our goal- finish our work out and get home. We took off! Full speed. Of course being the competitive people we are both of us wanted to get to the top of the hill first. He accomplished that goal first, but I walked away with a great lesson: Approach candidates the way I approach my run.

Take the hills with all my energy! Candidates that are not actively seeking employment are my incline candidates. You can either passively approach them and try to gain their interest or you go at them with a lot of energy. I tend to take a deep breath and run up the hill with candidates that are not looking for a new opportunity. Recruiting the super passive candidate can be a challenge, just like the hills.  I have to not only convince them that the role could be a great career opportunity for them, but most importantly I have to develop a professional relationship with them, so they are willing to trust that I can help them find their next opportunity. This is not always easy or the “fun” part of the job, but it’s worth it. You can secure a quality candidate that can either fill the current position or become a part of your network for future possibilities.

Vary your work out when running! Sometimes you run at a moderate jog and other times you sprint. Varying your workout helps you to not become comfortable and no longer push yourself. Certain candidates return calls immediately while others seem to go into hiding when you need to speak with them. I learned to vary my approach to communicating with candidates. Technology has helped to make communication easier and efficient. Text messages, email, social media and phone calls are a regular part of my day. As I work with each candidate I ask what is the best way to communicate and when. This allows me to keep constant contact, but provides a candidate-focused approach.

In the recruiting industry you are constantly facing change. No matter how organized, efficient or diligent a recruiter you are you will still face hills and possibly stagnation. It is how you approach it that makes all the difference. You can run up a hill slow, conserve your energy and take longer to get to the top or you can give it all you got and get to the top quickly. You can use traditional methods of communication like home phones and email or you can include a variety that will help you expand your reach, and personalize your communications between you and the candidates you are working with. Either way is sufficient because the goal is to make it to the top of every hill and complete your run. As a recruiter my responsibility was to see which was best for me. I like to run the hills as fast and strong as I can. What type of runner are you?

Partnership Announcement

We are pleased to announce Learning Dynamics is partnering with LG Human Capital Solutions to support our efforts to enhance the services we offer our clients. This strategic partnership will combine LG Human Capital Solutions knowledge and proficiency in talent acquisition with Learning Dynamics expertise in training.

Join us for a COMPLIMENTARY workshop that our business partner is offering this Friday, October 14th for the Greater Atlanta Business Community on Common Decency® in the workplace.

  • Improved Employee Engagement & Increased Productivity
  • Increased Awareness of Legally Risky Employee Behaviors
  • Fewer Employee Relations Issues
  • Increased Productivity & Better Organizational Performance 

Session will be held at Leadership Strategies’ Office

211 Perimeter Center Parkway, Atlanta

9:00-10:30AM (Continental Breakfast and Networking at 8:30)

Not in the Atlanta area? Join us online for two spectacular webinars.

Meetings that Drive Results-October 14, 2016 from 11:30 AM – 12:00 Noon (online format)

Safe and Sound (Workplace Violence Awareness)- November 7, 2016 from 11:30 – 12:00 Noon

Contact Kendall to save your seat! Kendall@TheLambrightGroup.com

For additional information, please visit www.TheLambrightGroup.com or www.LearningDynamics.com

I Became A Better Recruiter By Running With My Husband

My husband and business partner has been in the staffing and recruiting industry for over 20 years. He’s worked in corporate recruitment and at agencies, he’s been a contract recruiter and now owns his own executive search firm. I was an educator. I taught from first grade up to college until I decided to make a change and come to work for our company full-time as a recruiter. I remember how I would listen to Kendall’s phone screens when he worked from home which helped a lot. I felt comfortable to begin my new career, but understood that there would be a learning curve.

After a few years of recruiting and taking on other responsibilities in the firm, I strengthened my skills and was becoming a successful recruiter. I enjoy continuous learning, so I attend workshops, webinars and networking events to help me keep abreast of the best practices and strategies in recruiting. My most effective learning experience was when I began running with my husband.

He and I will sometimes run in our neighbor or at the high school track. We do sprints, jogs and even run the stadium stairs. One day while running in our neighbor we approached a hill that has quite a steep incline. We had already run about two miles and I was not ready to take the hill. I was tired. He shared that we should run it with everything we had so to not prolong getting up it and it would bring us closer to our goal- finish our work out and get home. We took off! Full speed. Of course being the competitive people we are both of us wanted to get to the top of the hill first. He accomplished that goal first, but I walked away with a great lesson: Approach candidates the way I approach my run.

Take the hills with all my energy! Candidates that are not actively seeking employment are my incline candidates. You can either passively approach them and try to gain their interest or you go at them with a lot of energy. I tend to take a deep breath and run up the hill with candidates that are not looking for a new opportunity. Recruiting the super passive candidate can be a challenge, just like the hills.  I have to not only convince them that the role could be a great career opportunity for them, but most importantly I have to develop a professional relationship with them, so they are willing to trust that I can help them find their next opportunity. This is not always easy or the “fun” part of the job, but it’s worth it. You can secure a quality candidate that can either fill the current position or become a part of your network for future possibilities.

Vary your work out when running! Sometimes you run at a moderate jog and other times you sprint. Varying your workout helps you to not become comfortable and no longer push yourself. Certain candidates return calls immediately while others seem to go into hiding when you need to speak with them. I learned to vary my approach to communicating with candidates. Technology has helped to make communication easier and efficient. Text messages, email, social media and phone calls are a regular part of my day. As I work with each candidate I ask what is the best way to communicate and when. This allows me to keep constant contact, but provides a candidate-focused approach.

In the recruiting industry you are constantly facing change. No matter how organized, efficient or diligent a recruiter you are you will still face hills and possibly stagnation. It is how you approach it that makes all the difference. You can run up a hill slow, conserve your energy and take longer to get to the top or you can give it all you got and get to the top quickly. You can use traditional methods of communication like home phones and email or you can include a variety that will help you expand your reach, and personalize your communications between you and the candidates you are working with. Either way is sufficient because the goal is to make it to the top of every hill and complete your run. As a recruiter my responsibility was to see which was best for me. I like to run the hills as fast and strong as I can. What type of runner are you?

(Originally posted on 9/26/2016)